Topic 1

Topic 1

Digitalisation and connectivity

The world of work will become more digital, more flexible and more networked. It is characterized by a comprehensive digital transformation that includes or leads to new forms of work and work relationships, new technological developments and increasing networking. Artificial intelligence (AI) is on everyone's lips and will change people's lives and the world of work in unimagined ways. Smart digital systems and wearables are increasingly finding their way into the workplaces and industrial security is becoming more important as the number of dangerous attacks on networked industrial control systems increases. Join this session to look at current innovations and new emerging risks in the context of digitalisation and connectivity, their impact on the world of work and the respective approaches of occupational safety and health.

Topic 2

Topic 2

Changes in work organization

Megatrends like digitalisation, globalisation, demographic change etc. shape our life and the world of work. As a result, new forms of work and flexibility of work, such as mobile work and home office, grow rapidly. Besides positive effects like self-determined working hours and an improved work-life-balance, there is the danger of physical inactivity, lack of communication and self-exploitation. The shortage of skilled workers and an increasingly older workforce also lead to changes in work organisation and to an intensification of the workload. At the same time, the importance of informal work is increasing. In this session, we will approach the extent and impact of profound changes in the organisation of work and look at the opportunities and risks for safety and health. The discussion will include how to transition knowledge into practice.

Topic 3

Topic 3

Sustainable development and occupational safety

Climate change and its various effects is a challenge for mankind and the world of work all over the world. Climate change leads to growing exposure to heat and solar UV radiation, to new infectious diseases, new allergens and toxins etc. This and efforts towards decarbonization result into new risks and hazards for workers requiring adequate means and protective measures to ensure safe and healthy work. In this session we would like to look on the effects of the climate change on working conditions and the individuals in different industries. We would also like to discuss positive and inspiring examples out of the areas such as green economy, decarbonization and how to tackle existing and upcoming hazards for employees.

Topic 4

Topic 4

Vision Zero: Safety - Health - Wellbeing

Logo Vision Zero

Vision Zero is the vision of a world without occupational accidents and work-related illnesses. The highest priority is the prevention of fatal and serious occupational accidents and diseases. The 7 Golden Rules are the basis of a successful global prevention strategy that focuses on leadership culture, people-oriented work, social dialogue and sustainability in corporate culture. Vision Zero is based on the 3 pillars "Safety - Health - Wellbeing", and translates regulations into a simple, understandable and flexibly applicable action concept that is compatible with national regulations. Learn about good examples of successful implementation of Vision Zero in different branches.

Topic 5

Topic 5

Education and training

Education and training provide employers, managers, supervisors, workers and students with knowledge, skills and competences to enable them to identify hazards at the workplace and to take the right measures to control them. It improves their knowledge and skills in order to behave safely and healthily at the workplace. New technologies, distributed work arrangements, increased hours and pace of work as well as an increased diverse workforce also create special challenges for occupational safety and health personnel, employees and managers. In this session, new trends will be presented in adult-oriented teaching and learning in the field of OSH as well as new didactic approaches and methods, which have changed partly under the influence of the pandemic (e.g. hybrid learning, online events) and new training concepts in OSH will also be discussed.

Topic 6

Topic 6

Safety and health management

Efficiently organized occupational safety is becoming increasingly important as a competitive factor. After all, productivity and quality depend crucially on the safety, health and motivation of the people who work in the company. Systematic occupational safety and effective occupational safety management systems therefore help and this means: planning occupational safety and health in a targeted manner, organizing it systematically and operating it consistently as a management task. This also includes reviewing the effectiveness of occupational safety and health management regularly and continuously improving it. In this session we will present successful examples of safety and health management and talk about it.

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS EXTENDED
UNTIL 20 MARCH

Dresden

Dresden

Dresden is the capital city of the Federal State of Saxony in Germany. It is situated in a valley on the river Elbe, near the Czech border. It extends across 328 square kilometers and has approximately 530,000 residents. Dresden is perfectly linked with the international transit network, and can be reached from every direction by rail, car or air. In terms of geographical size, Dresden is Germany’s fourth-largest city after Berlin, Hamburg and Cologne.

Dresden has a long history as the capital and royal residence for the electors and kings of Saxony, who for centuries furnished the city with cultural and artistic splendor. The city was known as the Jewel Box, because of its baroque and rococo city center. The controversial British and American bombing of Dresden in World War II towards the end of the war killed approximately 25,000, many of whom were civilians, and destroyed the entire city center. The bombing gutted the city, as it did for other major German cities. After the war restoration work has helped to reconstruct parts of the historic inner city, including the Katholische Hofkirche, the Semper Oper and the Dresdner Frauenkirche as well as the suburbs.

Before and since German reunification in 1990, Dresden was and is a cultural, educational, political and economic center of Germany and Europe. The Dresden University of Technology is one of the 10 largest universities in Germany and part of the German Universities Excellence Initiative. Read more…

Dresden

Dresden

Dresden is the capital city of the Federal State of Saxony in Germany. It is situated in a valley on the river Elbe, near the Czech border. It extends across 328 square kilometers and has approximately 530,000 residents. Dresden is perfectly linked with the international transit network, and can be reached from every direction by rail, car or air. In terms of geographical size, Dresden is Germany’s fourth-largest city after Berlin, Hamburg and Cologne.

Dresden has a long history as the capital and royal residence for the electors and kings of Saxony, who for centuries furnished the city with cultural and artistic splendor. The city was known as the Jewel Box, because of its baroque and rococo city center. The controversial British and American bombing of Dresden in World War II towards the end of the war killed approximately 25,000, many of whom were civilians, and destroyed the entire city center. The bombing gutted the city, as it did for other major German cities. After the war restoration work has helped to reconstruct parts of the historic inner city, including the Katholische Hofkirche, the Semper Oper and the Dresdner Frauenkirche as well as the suburbs.

Before and since German reunification in 1990, Dresden was and is a cultural, educational, political and economic center of Germany and Europe. The Dresden University of Technology is one of the 10 largest universities in Germany and part of the German Universities Excellence Initiative. Read more…

Dresden

Dresden

Dresden is the capital city of the Federal State of Saxony in Germany. It is situated in a valley on the river Elbe, near the Czech border. It extends across 328 square kilometers and has approximately 530,000 residents. Dresden is perfectly linked with the international transit network, and can be reached from every direction by rail, car or air. In terms of geographical size, Dresden is Germany’s fourth-largest city after Berlin, Hamburg and Cologne.

Dresden has a long history as the capital and royal residence for the electors and kings of Saxony, who for centuries furnished the city with cultural and artistic splendor. The city was known as the Jewel Box, because of its baroque and rococo city center. The controversial British and American bombing of Dresden in World War II towards the end of the war killed approximately 25,000, many of whom were civilians, and destroyed the entire city center. The bombing gutted the city, as it did for other major German cities. After the war restoration work has helped to reconstruct parts of the historic inner city, including the Katholische Hofkirche, the Semper Oper and the Dresdner Frauenkirche as well as the suburbs.

Before and since German reunification in 1990, Dresden was and is a cultural, educational, political and economic center of Germany and Europe. The Dresden University of Technology is one of the 10 largest universities in Germany and part of the German Universities Excellence Initiative. Read more…

Dresden

Dresden

Dresden is the capital city of the Federal State of Saxony in Germany. It is situated in a valley on the river Elbe, near the Czech border. It extends across 328 square kilometers and has approximately 530,000 residents. Dresden is perfectly linked with the international transit network, and can be reached from every direction by rail, car or air. In terms of geographical size, Dresden is Germany’s fourth-largest city after Berlin, Hamburg and Cologne.

Dresden has a long history as the capital and royal residence for the electors and kings of Saxony, who for centuries furnished the city with cultural and artistic splendor. The city was known as the Jewel Box, because of its baroque and rococo city center. The controversial British and American bombing of Dresden in World War II towards the end of the war killed approximately 25,000, many of whom were civilians, and destroyed the entire city center. The bombing gutted the city, as it did for other major German cities. After the war restoration work has helped to reconstruct parts of the historic inner city, including the Katholische Hofkirche, the Semper Oper and the Dresdner Frauenkirche as well as the suburbs.

Before and since German reunification in 1990, Dresden was and is a cultural, educational, political and economic center of Germany and Europe. The Dresden University of Technology is one of the 10 largest universities in Germany and part of the German Universities Excellence Initiative. Read more…

Dresden

Dresden

Dresden is the capital city of the Federal State of Saxony in Germany. It is situated in a valley on the river Elbe, near the Czech border. It extends across 328 square kilometers and has approximately 530,000 residents. Dresden is perfectly linked with the international transit network, and can be reached from every direction by rail, car or air. In terms of geographical size, Dresden is Germany’s fourth-largest city after Berlin, Hamburg and Cologne.

Dresden has a long history as the capital and royal residence for the electors and kings of Saxony, who for centuries furnished the city with cultural and artistic splendor. The city was known as the Jewel Box, because of its baroque and rococo city center. The controversial British and American bombing of Dresden in World War II towards the end of the war killed approximately 25,000, many of whom were civilians, and destroyed the entire city center. The bombing gutted the city, as it did for other major German cities. After the war restoration work has helped to reconstruct parts of the historic inner city, including the Katholische Hofkirche, the Semper Oper and the Dresdner Frauenkirche as well as the suburbs.

Before and since German reunification in 1990, Dresden was and is a cultural, educational, political and economic center of Germany and Europe. The Dresden University of Technology is one of the 10 largest universities in Germany and part of the German Universities Excellence Initiative. Read more…

About

Working on Safety

WOS is an international network of decision-makers, researchers and practitioners involved in the prevention of accidents and injuries at work.
The network aims to bring prevention experts together from all over the world in order to facilitate a high level exchange of experience, new findings and best practices between different countries and sectors. It will be an excellent occasion for representatives of H&S organisations, researchers, policy makers, safety professionals, labour inspectors, labour administrators and other experts in the prevention of occupational accidents and diseases to join in a permanent international expert network.

What to expect from the 2024 conference in Dresden

  • Safety meeting practice
  • Current case studies, measurements, research projects
  • Practice examples from industries
  • Successful implementations of Vision Zero in various industries
  • Nice and interesting people and a wonderful city
  • Interaction and lively exchange

We are looking forward to participants from the following fields

  • Researchers (young scientists are particularly welcome)
  • Safety and Health professionals
  • Safety practitioners from companies
  • Policy makers
  • Industry organisations
  • Labour inspections
  • Trade unions and employers
  • Standardisation bodies

Read more to WOS.net